ear-Wonderful-You-2500x1563-Amazon-Smashwords-Kobo-AppleAhead of schedule, the adoptee-authored anthology Dear Wonderful You: Letters to Adopted & Fostered Youth is now available in paperback format!

I’m very grateful to editors Diane Rene Christian and Mei-Mei Akwai Ellerman for inviting me to take part in this project. I hope that this book will find its way into the hands of young people in adoptive and foster homes, so that they will understand that they are not alone and that a great, big world of love and support is available to them.

A unique aspect of this particular book is that it includes contact information for each of the contributors. Adoptees and young people in foster care are welcome to write to us and share their own thoughts and feelings.

We are your sisters and brothers, and we are here for you.

ear-Wonderful-You-2500x1563-Amazon-Smashwords-Kobo-AppleI’m excited to share that the anthology Dear Wonderful You: Letters to Adopted & Fostered Youth is now available for Kindle pre-order. The book will be officially released on November 1.

In preparation for the anthology’s release, I joined the other adult adoptee contributors in recording a promo video in which we talk about the inspiration for our letters and what a book like this would have meant to us when we were younger. The full length video will be released soon; in the meantime, check out this short version:

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I see people make the mistake all the time of using “they/their” in their writing when they really should be using “he/his” or “she/hers.”

Incorrect: A middle-school kid should always do their homework on time, even if they would rather spend all their time texting.

Correct: A middle-school kid should always do his homework on time, even if he would rather spend all his time texting.

The sentence above is talking about only one kid, therefore “they/their” cannot be used because these words are always plural. Many people, however, use them anyway because they don’t want to have to specify whether the person being talked about is male or female. Sorry but, like it or not, you do have to choose either “he/his” or “her/hers” in a sentence like this one.

If you’re dead set on not specifying gender in a sentence like this, you must revise the sentence. Consider the following possibilities:

  • Middle-school kids should always do their homework on time, even if they would rather spend all their time texting.
  • A middle-school kid should always do homework on time, even if spending time texting is preferable to doing homework.
  • A middle-school kid should always do homework on time, even if that middle-schooler would rather spend every minute texting.

To find more tips, click on “grammar” under Bread Crumbs in the right-hand column.

Be careful to not create a chain reaction resulting in multiple posts of the same content to the same platform. For example, WordPress gives me the ability to share my posts with Facebook and Twitter. I can also set up Facebook to share updates with Twitter and/or set up Twitter to share tweets with Facebook. I do not want to send my blog posts from WordPress to Facebook and Twitter, and then also share my Facebook updates to Twitter, because this will result in one blog post being sent two times to Twitter, one right after the other. Do people do it? Yes, but it always looks sloppy to me. To avoid this, I set up WordPress to post to Facebook, and I set up Facebook to post to Twitter. This way, a blog post goes out once to Facebook and only once to Twitter, and I don’t annoy anyone.